Michigan Senate race

2 in Republican primary race

Ed McBroom

MARQUETTE — Voters in the Aug. 7 primary election will choose the candidates who will run for the Michigan Senate’s 38th District seat. The 38th District encompasses much of the Upper Peninsula, including Alger, Baraga, Delta, Dickinson, Gogebic, Houghton, Iron, Keweenaw, Marquette, Menominee, Ontonagon and Schoolcraft counties.

The seat is currently held by Sen. Tom Casperson, R-Escanaba, who will not be running for re-election due to term limits.

In the Aug. 7 primary, voters will choose between Ed McBroom, of Vulcan, and Mike Carey, of Crystal Falls, to represent the Republican Party in the November general election. Rep. Scott Dianda, D-Calumet, who is currently serving his third term as the representative for the state House’s 110th District is running unopposed in the primary for the Democratic Party. He will advance to the November general election to face either Carey or McBroom.

The winner of the November general election will be sworn in Jan. 1 and be limited to two four-year terms in the Michigan State Senate.

Republican candidates were asked three identical questions via email, with strict word limits. Below are the questions, followed by their replies, alphabetically, printed as received.

Mike Carey

Mike Carey

1.) List a few details of your background you think voters would want to know. (75 words)

I am a 6th generation Yooper with deep roots in the Upper Peninsula. I founded, own, and operate a building contracting company — employing twenty people. I understand, firsthand, the responsibility that comes with making payroll. I am a family man with a passion for helping my community. I am a Yooper through-and-through.

2.) What do you think are the most important issues facing the district? (100 words)

There are four immediate threats that need addressed: mental health crisis, drug use/addiction, energy independence, and insurance mandates. Each of these issues poses its own unique problem for us here in the Upper Peninsula. Each can be addressed with the help of public policy, but government cannot be the sole alleviator. Communities can do far more for each other than the state government can. The government must allow them the opportunity.

3.) Why do you think voters should choose you? (200 words)

The 38th District needs authentic leadership in Lansing that will fight for their interests and refuse to kowtow to special interests. I will continue to focus my energy on freeing Upper Peninsula businesses from burdensome economic regulations and taxes that look to squeeze every last dime out of taxpayers. We need to increase economic freedom. This will allow our community to promote its resources in such a way that will propel us to prosperity. Our land is uniquely blessed with resources that provide us with an equally unique opportunity to create well-paying jobs for our communities. My family has observed, firsthand, the evolution of the Upper Peninsula from a wilderness unwelcoming to human life and flourishment, into a community teeming with energy and opportunity. I wake up every morning with the well-being of my friends, family, and neighbors on my mind. I hope to bring this enthusiasm to Lansing and be the Upper Peninsula’s voice.

Ed McBroom

1.) List a few details of your background you think voters would want to know. (75 words)

I grew up on the family farm where I still farm with my family. We milk about 130 cows, growing corn, hay, and wheat. Sarah and I have 5 children, ages eleven to one. I graduated with degrees in music education and social studies education from NMU. I served 6 years in the Michigan House where I championed issues important to the UP, like curriculum flexibility, skilled trades, government transparency, and drug abuse reform.

2.) What do you think are the most important issues facing the district? (100 words)

Some critical U.P. issues include: reducing costs of auto insurance and energy; affordable energy policies; additional local road funding; securing more local school and parental control over curriculum choices for graduation; ending the dark stores loophole; fighting opioid abuse; expanding broadband; enhancing local land opportunities and input before governments purchase or restrict usage and access; and promoting skilled trades and workforce training. And, because of the relatively few elected state officials representing our interests, it will always remain crucial to respond to emerging issues by having good communications with leaders and residents across the U.P. and relationships with downstate officials.

3.) Why do you think voters should choose you? (200 words)

While I would be humbled to receive the support of voters in the District, I believe they should have confidence in voting for me as I have a proven record and reputation of honest and productive service to the U.P. I accomplished this by being available, transparent, honest, and willing to work with others. It’s why I believe I have been endorsed many, varied individuals and interests like Tom Casperson, Michigan Nurses Association, and the Chamber of Commerce. Some of these accomplishments have increased access to skilled trades and merit curriculum flexibility. I chaired the House Ethics Committee and worked for multiple reforms to Michigan government and ethics. I also sponsored the last successful reduction in income taxes and increased the homestead property tax credit. I was one of the most independent voices standing against either party whenever they dismissed or tried to bully the U.P. Much of this success was from having a strong team built between the few UP legislators – I was on this team and will work to see it re-established. I am not afraid of working hard and long hours representing the people and yet stay humbled by all that is farm life.