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Superior History

LaJoie’s (Jail)house in Negaunee

NEGAUNEE — In 1992, Negaunee native, Steve LaJoie purchased a historic home at 218 W. Case Street in Negaunee. For a few years, he and his family living in the home with it remaining in the same condition as when he acquired it. Then in 1998, he began to remodel portions of the building and ...

‘They paved paradise, and put up a parking lot’

MARQUETTE — Schools, churches, bars, stores, hospitals, and even an entire city street. When you're looking at parking lots in downtown Marquette, you’re looking at more than a place to store your car while you work or shop. You're also looking at a piece of the city’s history. To ...

Marquette has rich art heritage

MARQUETTE — As summer finally arrives in Marquette, our city is gearing up toward Art Week June 23-29. While this festival is only in its fifth year, Marquette and the natural beauty of the surrounding region has a long history of attracting artists to the area. Art historian, Edgar ...

Blemhuber family was agricultural innovators

Street signs are more than just geographical markers. Read right, they are portals into a community’s past. Consider Blemhuber Avenue, an east/west street south of Highway 41 in Marquette. This avenue honors a pioneering Marquette County family that helped to shape agriculture in the Upper ...

Part 2: Backward glance at the 1911 Hartford Mine disaster

Adapted from an article originally published in the USW Local 4974’s The Miners’ Voice, January 1983. Last week’s article discussed a fire at Negaunee’s Hartford Mine on Friday, May 5, 1911. As the situation was brought under control, they were finally able to obtain an accurate ...

Part 1: Backward glance at the 1911 Hartford Mine disaster

Adapted from an article originally published in the USW Local 4974’s The Miners’ Voice, January 1983 Friday, May 5, 1911, began like any other workday for Edward Puske of Negaunee. A recent immigrant from Finland, young Puske felt fortunate that he had finally secured employment as a ...

It was quite a week! Part 2

Last week’s article discussed the visits of Governor George Wallace and activist Abbie Hoffman on May 10th before Michigan’s May 1972 Presidential Primary. But they weren’t the only famous visitors to Marquette that week. On Friday afternoon, May 12, Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Lyndon ...

It was quite a week! (Part 1)

By JOHN CEBALO Marquette Regional History Center Special to the Journal MARQUETTE — There was one week in May 1972, the week prior to the Democratic Presidential primary election, when four figures of national political significance converged on the city of Marquette. Three of them ...

Legacy workshop coming up

MARQUETTE — From 6-8 p.m. Monday in the Heritage Room, the Peter White Public Library will be hosting a Personal Legacy Workshop with Heather Mlsna. If you have a writing project you’ve been meaning to start, this workshop is for you. Learn an easy method of organizing your thoughts so ...

History quiz

Q: What year did the women at the Gossard factory in Ishpeming go on strike, setting off the first strike in the Upper Peninsula dominated by female labor? A. 1926 B. 1937 C. 1949 D. 1956 A. C, 1949. (April 12)

Camp Sidnaw: German POWs in the U.P.

More than 370,000 German prisoners of war were housed in the United States in the final years of World War II. Approximately 1,100 were kept in five remote camps in the Upper Peninsula, near Au Train, Mass, Raco, Sidnaw, and Wetmore. German POWs supplied manpower for the local lumber industry. ...

Michigamme devastated by fire in 1873

“The confusion, the agony of the women and children, and the terror of the whole community, cannot be described. Men rushed wildly toward their houses to save their wives and children, women shrieked for aid, and children wailed for help which did not seem available.” ...

City official shot in the line of duty

MARQUETTE — Robert Hume was born in Ontario, Canada, and came to Marquette as a child in the 1860s. His first job was with at the city of Marquette as the first sexton at Park Cemetery, beginning in 1886. He worked with Peter White, the park commissioner to shape the look of the cemetery over ...

Capt. Bendry was quite a fellow

James “Captain Jim” Bendry was born in Wiltshire, England in June 1822 but he didn’t stay there long. At just 12 years old he signed on as a cabin boy on a merchant ship that sailed in the Mediterranean. Over the years he also worked on Atlantic routes between Liverpool, New Orleans, the ...

Local reading group to meet

MARQUETTE — The Transition Marquette County Reading Group will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Dandelion Cottage Room of Peter White Public Library to discuss “Sustaining Lake Superior” by Michigan Tech University professor Nancy Langston. Lake Superior has a fascinating history, ...

Superior History

“In the first eight or ten years of my experiences in Marquette, the flight of pigeons in the spring was a feature of life here. Everyone turned out with shot-guns.” — John M. Longyear In 1833, renowned ornithologist John James Audubon, identified the passenger pigeon as the most ...

Harvey named for talented engineer

Charles Thompson Harvey (1829-1912) was born in Colchester, Connecticut. His father was Joseph Harvey, outspoken pastor of the affluent Congregational Church of Westchester. His mother was Catherine Desire Seldon Harvey, granddaughter of the famous Colonel Samuel Selden who died from wounds ...

The 1889 typhoid epidemic in Negaunee

During the 19th century, typhoid fever was not uncommon in Upper Peninsula, so when William Prisk, age 20, died in Negaunee on Aug. 26, 1889, nothing seemed out of the ordinary. But two weeks later, the paper noted, that while the number of typhoid fever cases in Negaunee was not increasing, ...

A history of Pewabic pottery in the U.P.

St. Peter Cathedral underwent renovations in 2008. The tired rust-colored carpeting was replaced with lovely tiles. During this renovation project, Pewabic pottery tiles were uncovered, possibly dating back to the Cathedral’s restoration after it was damaged by fire in 1935. This was ...

William Washington Gaines and Gaines Rock

For some ex-slaves, the remoteness of the Upper Peninsula represented freedom and the chance for a new life. In the days before railways simplified overland travel, most people came here by ship, and maritime transport was relatively slow and difficult. Bounty hunters who kidnapped suspected ...