×

History marked

Marquette Regional History Center presents annual awards

Susan Hornbogen, left, president of the Marquette Regional History Center, presents John P. Case with the Helen Longyear Paul Award. The recognition was made during Wednesday’s MRHC annual meeting at the center. (Journal photo by Christie Bleck)

MARQUETTE — Local historian John P. Case and the Bishop Baraga Association were recognized on Wednesday at the Marquette Regional History Center’s annual meeting.

Case was given the Helen Longyear Paul Award, which recognizes individuals who have contributed significantly to the enhancement, restoration, conservation or interpretation of the area’s history. The Bishop Baraga Association received the Peter White Memorial Award, which is given to groups that meet the same criteria for making a significant contribution.

“John has been a supporter, collector, writer and teacher of local history, which has benefited the Marquette Regional History Center and those who have been lucky enough to hear him speak,” said MRHC President Susan Hornbogen.

His other activities include acting as the tour guide and speaker at the annual fundraiser at the Stone House along Ives Lake on Huron Mountain Club property.

“It’s been good for me, it’s been good for my family, to be involved in things like this,” Case said of his involvement in local history.

Susan Hornbogen, left, president of the Marquette Regional History Center, presents Lenora R. McKeen, executive director of the Bishop Baraga Association, with the Peter Memorial Award. The recognition was made during Wednesday’s MRHC annual meeting at the center. (Journal photo by Christie Bleck)

Hornbogen introduced Lenora R. McKeen, executive director of the Bishop Baraga Association and the Baraga Educational Center, which is located in the renovated Baraga House at 615 S. Fourth St. in Marquette.

Hornbogen said Bishop Frederic Baraga lived there for the last two years of his life. Displays include his vestments that were made out of deerskin by Native Americans and other artifacts. Plans include a garden, a contemplation area and a replica of Mala Vas, Slovenia, the bishop’s birthplace.

“The work of the Bishop Baraga Association is important because it preserves the legacy of the man who pioneered contact with Native Americans in the Upper Great Lakes and northern Wisconsin, and left a mark on both the European and Native culture,” Hornbogen said.

McKeen said: “We want you to know who Bishop Baraga was because he was so instrumental in the history of Marquette County, and really, beyond.”

McKeen stressed she wants the center to be a place where people can perform research and “unplug for minute, and unwind and recenter” at the gardens.

MRHC Executive Director Cris Osier presented a synopsis of 2019 history center activities.

“We sold out Kaufman Auditorium for the first time in January 2019 with ‘What’s Up, Dock? A History of the Harbor,'” Osier said. “We cannot thank Jack Deo and Jim Koski enough for their time and talents they put into these shows.

“This is an important fundraiser for the center at a time of year when not many people are coming to the exhibit galleries.”

Another popular event was the South Marquette Walking Tour in August.

“When Jim Koski and I saw people coming and coming and coming to meet us at Mares-Z-Doats that evening, we couldn’t believe it,” Osier said. “We lost count quickly as to how many people were there, but due to the amount in the donation bin, we knew it was just under 300 people.

“The tour was incredible because of the stories and the families that lived in south Marquette, and of course, it inspired our North vs. South show this year.”

That event, “North vs. South Marquette,” took place in January at Kaufman Auditorium.

“2019 was certainly a full year,” Osier said.

The annual meeting also featured a re-enactment of the Woman’s Welfare Club of Marquette, which focused on women’s voting rights in the area. Taking part were Rosemary Michelin, Jill LaMere, Fran Darling, Sue VanderVeen and Mary Davis.

Upcoming events at the MRHC include:

“Sites of Refuge and Resilience: Anishinaabe Logging Settlements,” at 6:30 p.m. March 25.

“Third Annual Trivia Night,” at 6:30 p.m. April 22.

“The Archaeology of POW Camp Au Train,” at 6:30 p.m. April 29.

The history center is located at 145 W. Spring St. For more information, visit marquettehistory.org or call 906-226-3571.

Christie Bleck can be reached at 906-228-2500, ext. 250. Her email address is cbleck@miningjournal.net.