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Snow keeps falling on much of Midwest

February 23, 2013
By COREY WILLIAMS , Associated Press

DETROIT - Eulas Henderson was in no hurry Friday morning while clearing still-falling snow from the sidewalk outside his Detroit home.

After all, it was his second foray into a winter storm that moved swiftly through Michigan after dumping more than a foot of snow Wednesday and Thursday across parts of the Midwest.

Even as he shoveled, Henderson's work was being covered.

Article Photos

South Range resident Larry Juntunen snowblows his driveway on Fourth Street after the two-day blizzard Houghton County and surrounding areas received this week. Much of the Upper Peninsula, along with the rest of the Midwest, has been pounded with snow in recent weeks. (Houghton Daily Mining Gazette photo by David Archambeau)

"It's not frustrating. I enjoy it. It's the normal thing to do in the winter time," said Henderson, a 56-year-old security guard. "There's only been a few times I've had to shovel. It's not to the point where you feel it's a burden."

By early Friday afternoon nearly 3 inches of snow was reported in the Detroit area. About 5 inches had fallen farther north in Saginaw and 4.5 inches in St. Clair County.

Muskegon in West Michigan had received 4 inches. About 6 inches has been reported in Gratiot County's Breckenridge.

The snow was expected to change to freezing drizzle in some areas.

Parts of the Upper Peninsula were expected to get 3 to 5 inches of snow by the time the storm wraps up and continues northeast. That follows a strong storm earlier in the week that dumped more than 20 inches of snow on parts of the UP, closing roads and schools.

The snow blew into the Detroit area Friday in time for the morning traffic rush. Within two hours, most surface streets and freeways were a sloshy mess. On the Lodge Freeway heading into downtown from Detroit's northwest suburbs some motorists kept to speeds of about 25 mph to 30 mph.

Head bowed and arms crossed, 45-year-old Patrice Denham pushed herself into the face of the swirling snow in Detroit's Woodbridge neighborhood. Denham had just walked several blocks to her complex's leasing office for a new mailbox key and was heading back to her town house to watch TV.

"You live in the city of Detroit and you do what you have to do," Denham said, referring to winter weather. "If it's going to be cold, it's going to be cold. But this has been only an average winter."

 
 

 

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