Today in History: Sally Ride becomes America’s first woman in space in 1983

By The Associated Press

Today is Monday, June 18, the 169th day of 2018. There are 196 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight

in History:

On June 18, 1983, astronaut Sally K. Ride became America’s first woman in space as she and four colleagues blasted off aboard the space shuttle Challenger on a six-day mission.

On this date:

In 1778, American forces entered Philadelphia as the British withdrew during the Revolutionary War.

In 1812, the War of 1812 began as the United States Congress approved, and President James Madison signed, a declaration of war against Britain.

In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte met his Waterloo as British and Prussian troops defeated the French in Belgium.

In 1908, William Howard Taft was nominated for president by the Republican National Convention in Chicago.

In 1918, “The Ziegfeld Follies of 1918,” featuring the Irving Berlin song “Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning,” opened on Broadway.

In 1940, during World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill urged his countrymen to conduct themselves in a manner that would prompt future generations to say, “This was their finest hour.” Charles de Gaulle delivered a speech on the BBC in which he rallied his countrymen after the fall of France to Nazi Germany.

In 1948, Columbia Records publicly unveiled its new long-playing phonograph record in New York.

In 1953, a U.S. Air Force Douglas C-124 Globemaster II crashed near Tokyo, killing all 129 people on board. Egypt’s 148-year-old Muhammad Ali Dynasty came to an end with the overthrow of the monarchy and the proclamation of a republic.

In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Japanese Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda spoke to each other by telephone as they inaugurated the first trans-Pacific cable completed by AT&T between Japan and Hawaii.

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter and Soviet President Leonid I. Brezhnev signed the SALT II strategic arms limitation treaty in Vienna.

In 1986, 25 people were killed when a twin-engine plane and helicopter carrying sightseers collided over the Grand Canyon.

In 1996, Richard Allen Davis was convicted in San Jose, California, of the 1993 kidnap-murder of 12-year-old Polly Klaas of Petaluma. Davis remains on death row.

Ten years ago: Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama said he would bring Osama bin Laden to justice in a way that wouldn’t allow the terrorist mastermind to become a martyr, but that bin Laden might be killed if the U.S. government found him. Bin Laden was tracked down and slain by U.S. forces in May 2011 during Obama’s presidency. French filmmaker Jean Delannoy died in Guainville, France, at age 100.

Five years ago: The Taliban and the U.S. said they would hold talks on finding a political solution to ending nearly 12 years of war in Afghanistan, as the international coalition formally handed over control of the country’s security to the Afghan army and police. Declaring “the days of Rambo are over,” Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management for U.S. Special Operations Command, said that cultural, social and behavioral concerns might be bigger hurdles than tough physical fitness requirements for women looking to join the military’s special operations units.

One year ago: Charleena Lyles, a 30-year-old African-American mother of four, was shot and killed by two white Seattle police officers after she called 911 to report a burglary; authorities said Lyles had pulled a knife on the officers. Nabra Hassanen, a 17-year-old Muslim girl, was killed as she walked to her mosque in Sterling, Virginia; a suspect was arrested.