UPAWS relocates animals to its new shelter

DJ Morgan Heredia’s, UPAWS caregiver, reflection can be seen as he checks in on Nina the cat as she settles into her new cat condo. After 40 years in the old building on Snowfield road in Negaunee the Upper Peninsula Animal Shelter has moved to its new facility on County road 553. The shelter will be closed until the 28th, but it is open to take surrender animals and strays with a telephoned appointment. Dave Mahan, Marq-Tran bus driver, volunteered his time and the company donated the use of one of it’s buses to bring all the cats from the old shelter to the new shelter. "This building is not just bigger, its a brand new idea for animal welfare. Its a new generation,” said Kori Tossava, UPAWS capital campaign manager. “Back in the old day when old animal shelter were built they were really just ment to house animals temporarily. We have animals that stay with us on and off for a year, so we had to create a facility that allowed us to make individual comforting environments for an animal based on their species and based on their personality. So we have cat cat colonies, we have cat condos—for the cats — we have real life rooms for dogs we have private kennels for dogs, so that we can really place that animal into a place where they are going to be as comfortable as possible for as long as they stay with us.”

MARQUETTE — After 40 years in its old building along Snowfield Road in Negaunee, the Upper Peninsula Animal Welfare Shelter has moved to a new facility off Marquette County Road 553.

The shelter will be closed until Jan. 28, but it will accept surrendered animals and strays with a telephoned appointment.

Marq-Tran bus driver Dave Mahan volunteered his time and the company donated the use of one of its buses to bring all the cats from the old shelter to the new facility Friday.

“This building is not just bigger, it’s a brand new idea for animal welfare. It’s a new generation,” said Kori Tossava, UPAWS capital campaign manager. “Back in the old day when old animal shelters were built they were really just meant to house animals temporarily. We have animals that stay with us on and off for a year, so we had to create a facility that allowed us to make individual comforting environments for an animal based on their species and based on their personality. So we have cat colonies, we have cat condos–for the cats — we have real life rooms for dogs, we have private kennels for dogs, so that we can really place that animal into a place where they are going to be as comfortable as possible for as long as they stay with us.”

Corey Kelly can be reached at 906-228-2500, ext. 243. Her email address is ckelly@miningjournal.net.