Marching for science

Marching for science

Dozens of people joined the March for Science from the Berry Events Center to the Marquette Commons on Saturday morning. The march was a satellite event associated with the March for Science in Washington DC. The second annual march was meant to unite, educate and encourage the public to keep political leaders and policymakers accountable for enacting evidence-based policies for the common good. (Journal photos by Corey Kelly)

By COREY KELLY

Journal Staff Writer

MARQUETTE — A Northern Michigan University student organization led a satellite March for Science in Marquette Saturday morning. The second annual march was meant to unite, educate and encourage the public to hold political leaders and policymakers accountable for enacting evidence-based policies for the common good.

From Washington D.C. to Puduchcheri, India, marches in more than 230 communities across the world were expected Saturday during the global movement.

Participants met at the Berry Events Center, then marched the length of Third Street to the Marquette Commons where a rally was held. Opening the rally was an American Indian Movement song for protection sung by the Morning Thunder Singers from Marquette.

“We have to do what we can to protect the Earth and science is a good way to do that,” said April Lindala, a Morning Thunder Singer performer and Northern Michigan University professor who spoke at the event.

Holly Roth, one of the lead student organizers of the event, reflected on the movement’s mission.

“I want it to continue with the goal that we had for last year of just advocating as much as possible for evidence-based policy and sound science that continues into the future,” Roth said.

Roth worries about the different social or political pressures that currently threaten support of the sciences.

“I want to be able to continue in my field without feeling like what I put out there is going to be attacked,” Roth said.

The event remained as nonpartisan as possible, Roth said, “because science is something that is for everyone, it’s not a two-party decision. Science helps the entire human race.”

After the rally, the crowd was invited inside the commons building for hot coffee and a series of “teach-ins.” Speakers presented each teach-in on special topics like environmental justice, indigenous rights and local renewable energies. In a separate area of the commons, various social, political and environmental advocacy groups set up informational displays for attendees to peruse.

For those who missed the march but want to participate in science advocacy, Roth suggested to “stay informed as much as you can and continue to push for sound decisions and policy, and vote too.”

Corey Kelly can be reached at 906-228-2500, ext. 243. Her email address is photos@miningjournal.net.

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