New at Peter White Public Library

It’s late July and that means we are (finally!) into full summer vacation mode! Whether you are a beach bum, backwoods braveheart or a glamping enthusiast, your experience will be complete when you pack a new novel.

“Do Not Become Alarmed” by Maile Meloy

Liv and Nora take their families on a holiday cruise and everyone is thrilled. The ship’s comforts are enjoyed by all. The children love the buffet and the independence the ship offers. But when they go on an onshore excursion, the families find themselves far from the ship’s safety.

“No One is Coming to Save Us” by Stephanie Powell Watts

JJ Ferguson has returned home to Pinewood, North Carolina, to build his dream house and to pursue his high school sweetheart. As he reenters his hometown, he’s shocked to find that the people he once knew have changed, just as he has. JJ’s return, the wealth he’s accumulated and his plan to build the dream home stirs up not only his family, but the entire town.

“Since We Fell” by Dennis Lehane

After Rachel Childs suffers an on-air breakdown, she lives as a shut-in. However, she now enjoys her ideal life with an ideal husband — until a chance encounter causes that life to dissolve. She finds herself within a conspiracy and must find the will to conquer her deepest fears.

“American War” by Omar El Akkad

Sarat Chestnut is only 6 when the Second American Civil War breaks out in 2074. When her father is killed and her family is forced into Camp Patience for displaced persons, she grows up shaped by surroundings. The decisions she soon have tremendous consequences not just for Sarat but for her family and her country, rippling through generations of both strangers and family.

“Marlena” by Julie Buntin

Everything about 15-year-old Cat’s new town in rural Michigan is lonely, until she meets her neighbor, the manic, beautiful, pill-popping Marlena. Cat, naïve and desperate for connection, is quickly lured into Marlena’s circle. As the two girls turn the untamed landscape of the desolate small town into their playground, Cat catalogues a litany of firsts while Marlena’s habits grow more sinister. Within the year, Marlena is dead, drowned in six inches of icy water. Now decades later, Cat finds herself still tangled in the past.

“The Girl Before” by JP Delaney

After a traumatic break-in, Emma needs a new place to live. Finally she finds a safe, affordable option that is also an architectural masterpiece. But there are rules. The enigmatic architect who designed the house retains full control: no books, no throw pillows, no photos or clutter or personal effects of any kind. The space is intended to transform its occupant–and it does. After her own personal tragedy, Jane also needs a fresh start. When she finds One Folgate Street she, too, is drawn to the space — and to its creator. Moving in, Jane soon learns about the untimely death of the home’s previous tenant. As Jane tries to uncover the truth she finds herself on the same path, and experiences the same terror, as the girl before.

“Saints for All Occasions” by J. Courtney Sullivan

Nora and Theresa Flynn are young women they leave Ireland for America. Nora is the responsible sister; she’s shy and serious and Theresa is gregarious — thrilled by their new life in Boston. When Theresa ends up pregnant, Nora is forced to come up with a plan — a decision with repercussions they have yet to understand. Fifty years later, Nora is the matriarch of her big Catholic family with four grown children. Theresa is now a cloistered nun and estranged from her sister. After decades of silence, Nora and Theresa are forced to confront choices they made 50 years before.

“Magpie Murders” by Anthony Horowitz

When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway’s latest novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different from any of his others. Alan’s traditional formula has been hugely successful — so successful that she must continue to put up with his increasingly questionable behavior if she wants to keep her job. Conway’s latest tale includes the standard dead bodies and intriguing suspects, but as Susan reads, she’s convinced there’s a real story hidden in the manuscript.

By Heather Steltenpohl

Development Director