BREAKING NEWS

BREAKING NEWS

Local briefing

Lake fish plan commentary

GRAND HAVEN, Mich. (AP) — Michigan officials are taking feedback on a long-term plan for managing Lake Michigan fish populations and future stocking activities.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is hosting the last of three public meetings on the topics Thursday in Grand Haven. Others were held this week in Manistique and Traverse City.

The DNR and other state and tribal agencies are trying to balance Lake Michigan’s predator fish with available prey. Michigan reduced Chinook salmon stocking in its waters by about 40 percent last year. Stakeholder groups this year recommended cutbacks in predators besides Chinook.

Among options are reducing brown trout, moving some coho salmon to the southern part of the lake and reducing second-priority lake trout stocking sites in northern Lake Michigan.

Horse killed by deer hunter

BEULAH, Mich. (AP) — A hunter killed a red-and-white horse in northern Michigan, apparently believing it was a deer.

The owner tells TV station WPBN that the horse was found near a bait pile in Benzie County on Nov. 19, the fifth day of deer season.

Tracii Kunish-Chandler says it’s hard to imagine that the 83-year-old hunter couldn’t recognize the animal. She says the horse, named Kodi, weighed 1,100 pounds. A gunshot was heard after legal hunting hours.

WPBN says the man has been charged with careless discharge of a gun.

93-pound rock to be displayed

DETROIT (AP) — A 93-pound (42-kilogram) Petoskey rock illegally removed from Lake Michigan will be permanently displayed in Detroit.

State parks chief Ron Olson tells The Associated Press that the big specimen will be moved to Michigan’s popular Outdoor Adventure Center, east of downtown near the Detroit River. He says it probably will be displayed under an indoor waterfall in November.

The Petoskey stone is Michigan’s state stone. It’s considered a fossilized coral. When wet or polished, a distinctive pattern emerges.

People who find most Petoskey stones can fit them in their pocket. But in 2015, a Manistee County man discovered a huge one near Northport, lugged it to shore and took it home.

State conservation officers seized it. It’s illegal to remove more than 25 pounds of rocks from the Great Lakes.